Condor Court

Condor Court

Condor Court is an outdoor habitat that tells the story of the National Aviary’s work to save threatened Andean Condors and preserve their high mountain habitats.

With a wingspan of 10 feet, Andean Condors are one of the largest raptors in the world. Condor Court provides these massive birds with ample room to stretch their wings, rocky mountain ledges for perching almost 20 feet in the air, and nesting cavities.

In the educational Conservation Station, you can get up close to the condors and watch them from behind large glass viewing panels. From there, you can observe these impressive birds engaging in natural behaviors: you may see them spread their wings to sun themselves or fly from perch to perch.

As you walk through this beautiful outdoor space, find elegant Demoiselle Cranes and colorful King Vultures. Birds in Condor Court change seasonally and according to each species’ habitat needs. Sun-loving species enjoy summers in Condor Court, and winter-hardy birds accustomed to cold climates spend their winters there.

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